The impact of symbols on logo design

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If you are a logo designer and need to design a creative logo for your client, keep in mind that the most dynamic tool used in the logo is the “symbol.”

A well-created and masterpiece logo indicates a strong identity for the company, along with the appreciation of all those who are associated with that logo.

As designers, we have to recognize the power of symbols in creating logos.

The question that needs to be asked then is, “what is a symbol” in terms of logo design?

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In very simple terms, it is an element that indicates a story.

In the modern world of design, symbols are very important.

This is because companies and brands want recognition for what they represent, rather than who they are.

 

Symbols for branding

Branding is everywhere in the world. Your brand is the main identity of your business.

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Your company makes sense to the world because of the branding.

If you psychologically see a logo, you are creating a brand that is deeply linked with the communication and feelings expressed by humans through symbols. For example, think about Nike.

When you see the Nike swoosh, you link human feelings through symbols.

People associate symbols with the business nature of your brand and then decide to interact or not.

Your logo must be strong and confidently give a creative idea to the audience.

How to use symbols in logos

Storytelling: Designers should always try to create or use symbols that tell a story.

Remember, not all symbols are able to represent all ideas.

You should make sure that the symbols which you are using are not just pretty objects, but also convey a concise message.

International aspects: Every symbol represents one culture that is different from other. So as a designer, you don’t have to focus on single-cultural symbols.

You do, however, need to examine symbols from various perspectives.

Who are the clients the brand is targeting? What is the culture of those clients?

To make any brand international, you should take note of the symbol’s identities.

Avoid conflicts: You can use more than one symbol, but take care that these symbols don’t cause friction. Create a logo with symbols that conveys a clear message to the audience.

Have you used symbols in logo design? Tell us your experience in the comments!

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About Cindy Robert

Cindy Robert is a freelance content writer from San Francisco, California. She has a wide range of experience in technical writing. Cindy loves to write on graphic design and has also contributed in writing for top custom logo design services such as Crafted Logo, 40 Dollar Logo, Logo Works, Logo Bee, etc.

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Comments

  1. Great article! I recently used a simple universal “house” symbol for the logo of a home health care services client. It was a three letter abbreviation typeface so I merged the symbol into the shape of the “p” to make it subtle and tasteful yet noticeable.

  2. Interesting article Cindy, thank you.
    I’m a logo designer, so yes I use symbols regularly.
    For me, it depends on what the client wants, and the nature of the business, or industry.
    I like to use symbols where appropriate, as they open up branding opportunities, as regards Identity elements and the like.
    I consider these extended elements even if the project is just for a logo, as you never know when you could get thrown extra work in the future!

  3. Wonderful Information

  4. Oscarphone says:

    Remember that symbols mean different things to different cultures. I stumbled onto this a number of years ago (yow almost 20 now!) as I was designing for quite a few Chinese manufacturing clients. This particulate logotype utilized four diamonds in a formation with one accented in a color. The client, a Korean with Chinese family was steeped in both cultures. He freaked out when he saw the logotype. I started to sweat. But he was freaking out in a good way as the diamonds were good luck and having one accented meant something else very positive for Chinese. He loved it. I was smart that day . . .